Self-harm is the act of intentionally hurting your own body. Skin-cutting or burning are the most common types of self-harm. Self-harm generally occurs when a person faces painful emotions that seem overwhelming or experiences intense feelings of self-hatred. By physically injuring themselves, a person who self-harms feels in control and is able to temporarily relieve their intense emotions. The release provided by self-harm passes quickly, replaced by feelings of guilt and shame.

In children and teenagers, self-harm is sometimes a cry for help or attention. Although self-harm is not usually a suicide attempt, it is a very unhealthy and dangerous way of coping with feelings of anger, frustration or emotional pain. Seeing a mental health professional can help individuals who self-harm to find positive and healthy ways to cope with negative feelings and put an end to their destructive behavior.

Therapists specialising in Self-Harming

Amanda Copeland

Cognitive analytic psychotherapist

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Chris Molyneux

BACP Senior Accredited Person-Centred Counsellor & Supervisor

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Lorri Craig

Psychologist. Therapist Counsellor

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Duncan Long

Counsellor & Therapist

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Emma Russell

Humanistic Integrative Counsellor

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Jake Yearsley

Integrative counsellor

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Kate McGuire

Trauma and Psychosexual Therapist

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Gavin Beard

Psychotherapist and Trauma Specialist Using EMDR

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Lukas Dressler

Psychologist (MSc.) & Integrative Psychotherapist

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Nicola Turner

Psychotherapist, NeurOptimal® neurofeedback trainer

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Stephanie Fortescue

Psychodynamic Therapist

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Sarah Bailes

Psychotherapeutic Counsellor

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Serena Roche

Psychotherapist

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Will Geffin

We Can Change Integrated Therapy

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